Rental Application Process (Part 4 of 6): Prospective Applicants & Purchasing Existing Manufactured Home in the Community

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Purchaser of Existing Manufactured Home in the Park

When any existing resident intends to sell their manufactured home the resident must do the following:

1. Give the landlord a written 10-day notice of their intent to sell their manufactured home. (Note: The 10 days will run parallel with the 7 day application process – i.e. if the resident notifies the landlord of intent to sell the home and does not give the 10 day notice, then the application process time to approve or reject can take nor more 10 days - rather than 7 days. If you want more time, insert the longer time on the MHCO Application form and have the prospective resident sign it.)

2. The existing resident must advise the prospective purchaser that they have to fill out an application with the landlord and be approved.

3. Do not move anyone into the manufactured home that has not been approved through the tenant screening and approval process and signed all necessary documents, including the rental agreement.

If you are aware of a sale and do not have the purchaser fill out an application, or fail to advise the seller and prospective purchaser in writing that the application has been rejected within the applicable period of time (seven days, tens days or longer, as discussed above) after they fill out the application, then the purchaser can move into the mobile home under the same condition of the rental agreement of the seller. Basically, they assume the existing rental agreement you have with the current resident who is the seller of the manufactured home.

If a prospective tenant refuses to provide you with the necessary information for you to qualify them, then it is an automatic denial of the applicant.

It is important that an application is filled out and you check out the person carefully. You should check them out the same as you do any prospective resident. You do not have to approve the person just because they are buying an existing home in the park. If they have a bad credit or rental history, they can be refused as a prospective tenant. This does not necessarily kill the sale of the mobile home. They can still purchase the home, they just cannot keep it in the park. You need to provide a written rejection to both the seller and prospective purchaser. You need to advise them why they were not accepted. If you denied them for credit reasons, give the applicant the name and phone number of the company who provided you with the report. Advise the applicant that they can call them if they have any questions regarding the report.

If a resident sells their home and the new owner of the home has not filled out an application prior to moving into the home, you do not need to accept them as a resident. You have no contract with them and you can request them to remove the home from the park.

DO NOT ALLOW PROSPECTIVE TENANTS TO MOVE IN BEFORE THE SCREENING PROCESS HAS BEEN COMPLETED, AND THE APPLICANT HAS BEEN APPROVED AND SIGNED, AND RECEIPTED FOR THE STATEMENT OF POLICY, RULES AND REGULATIONS AND RENTAL AGREEMENT. DO NOT ACCEPT RENT FROM ANYONE THAT YOU HAVE NOT APPROVED TO LIVE IN THAT HOME.

If you accept rent before you qualify them then you may have established them as a tenant. Simply tell them that you cannot accept the rent until they fill out an application and are accepted by the landlord.

DO NOT HAVE ANYONE SIGN A RENTAL AGREEMENT UNTIL YOU HAVE RUN CREDIT, RENTAL AND CRIMINAL CHECKS ON THEM AND THEY HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED.