2015 Oregon Legislative Session Adjourns - The Good and the Ugly and Nothing In Between

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Earlier this week the 2015 Oregon Legislative Session adjourned.    This session was notable for two reasons – the first for passing MHCO’s long awaited changes eliminating past due taxes on abandoned homes and the second for the tenacity of rent control to raise it’s head in floor debates, a legislative work group proposal and amendments. 

 

The increase in the cost of housing  particularly in many of Oregon’s urban areas manifested itself in a drive to bring forward rent control in various forms.  This will not be the last we hear of rent control as we head into 2016.  Considering that in many cases MHCO was able to defeat rent control by just one vote in committee raises concerns as we set our sights on the February 2016 Oregon Legislative Session and especially the 2017 Oregon Legislative Session if elections continue to go as badly as they have for the business community over the past four years. 

 

In the end, MHCO is thrilled with what we were able to accomplish in the 2015 Legislative Session – one of the best pieces of pro-landlord legislation in the last decade, but we have serious reservations where the Legislature is headed on issues that are of great concern to landlords and business owners. 

 

MHCO will be providing extensive information on the new tax rules for abandoned homes later this year at the MHCO Annual Conference as well as information on other issues in the 2015 Landlord Tenant Coalition Bill that passed in this Legislative Session.  The new laws do not go into effect until January 1, 2016.  New forms will be necessary – MHCO will have those available to members on-line later this year as well.

 

Finally, here is a summary of some of the legislation that MHCO worked to defeat this session.  Other than the Coalition Bill (HB 3016) there were no other bills that MHCO supported – that in itself is a sad commentary on this legislative session considering the thousands of bills introduced.

 

MHCO Legislative Summary – MHCO Defeated Proposed Legislation

 

HB 2564 – (Inclusionary Zoning) Permits local governments to impose conditions on approved permits that effectively establish sales price for up to 30 percent of residential development or limit purchase to class or group of purchasers in exchange for one or more developer incentives.

 

This bill was the source of a lot of angst this session – with rent control advocates mentioning the need for rent control during the House Floor debate on this bill.  In the Senate rent control advocate drafted a rent control amendment (dash 5) – amendment defeated by just one vote in committee.

 

HB 2573 - Authorizes residential tenant to install on premises and use electric vehicle charging station for personal, noncommercial use.  Likely to be re-visited in Feb 2016.

 

HB 3494 - Prohibits landlord from requiring applicant or tenant to declaw or devocalize animal otherwise allowed on premises or to advertise in manner that discourages application from potential applicant with otherwise allowed animal that has not been declawed or devocalized.  Fine up to $1,000.

 

HB 3076A - Requires Oregon Health Authority to analyze ground water contaminant data and provide education in problem areas.  Would have increased reporting requirements for manufactured home communities operating wells.  Likely to be re-visited in Feb 2016.

 

HB 3081 - Directs Department of Consumer and Business Services to adopt by rule standards to address conflicts of interest of manufactured structure dealers that are also residential landlords.

 

HB 3129 - Authorizes tenant to whom real estate has been leased by landlord to install and use electric vehicle charging station for personal, noncommercial use.

 

SB 592 - Repeals law that prevents local governments from imposing conditions on approved permits that effectively establish sales price for residential development or limit purchase to class or group of purchasers. 

 

This bill became the vehicle for a proposed Legislative Work Group on Manufactured Housing.  This amendment was defeated in committee by one vote. 

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